Court Martial's at Hancock Barracks

Transcribed from a Military book in the Museum’s collection dating from 1843 through 1845.

The following are all from Hancock Barracks.

 

 

Charge Sleeping on post

 

Specifications in this that Michael Carlos a private company B 1st artillery being a member of the guard at Hancock barracks Maine on or about 2 AM November 14th 1844 and being duly posted as a sentinel was found sleeping on his post to watch. Prisoner pleaded not guilty

 

 

Charge and Specifications

The Court after mature deliberation and the testimony address, the court finds the prisoner Michael Carlos of company B  1st artillery guilty of the charges and specifications and do therefore sentence him to the wall in front of the guard house in charge of the guard for 10 consecutive days with four 2 pound balls in a knapsack tied to his back with an interruption of an hour for dinner and an hour for breakfast in addition to solitary confinement and bread and water for 20 days.

 

Charge and specifications

Private James Carr company B 1st artillery charge of habitual drunkenness

Specifications in the James Carr a Private and Company B 1st Artillery has been habitually drunk and particularly on the 13th day of May 1844 and on or about the 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, here at Hancock barracks to which the charges and specifications and the prisoner pleads not guilty.

 

Findings and Sentencing

The Court after mature deliberation and the testimony address the court finds the prisoner James Carr Company B 1st Artillery guilty of the charges and therefore sentenced him to forfeit all pay and allowances which may be due him in the time of around this promulgation except that is what is doing Sutler and Laundress for services

 

 

 

Extract

By a General Court Marshall convened at Hancock Barracks on the 26th Day of July pursuant to orders No.1[1] and of which Major L Whiting 1st Artillery is President were tried Private Jeremiah Sullivan Company F 1st Artillery.

 

Charge Desertion

 

Specifications in this that Jeremiah Sullivan, a Private Company F 1st Regiment artillery did desert from the service of the United States at Hancock Barracks Maine on or about the 1st of August 1843.To which charge and specification the prisoner pleaded guilty.

 

Findings and Sentencing

The court after mature deliberation and the testimony address confirm the plea of the prisoner Jeremiah Sullivan a private of Company F 1st Regiment Artillery and do therefore sentence him to forfeit all pay and allowances excepting such sum as may be due the Sutler[2] and Laundress, to make good the time lost by desertion to receive thirty nine lashes on bare back, well laid on with a cow hide, to be at confined hard labor for the period of two months with a ball and chain[3], to forfeit four dollars of his monthly pay for the same time period.

 

 

 

Charge Desertion

 

Specifications in this that Daniel Shern, a Private Company F 1st Regiment artillery did desert from the service of the United States at Hancock Barracks Maine on or about the 1st of July and remained absent until he surrendered himself to the commanding officer at Fort Sullivan[4] [Eastport Maine] on the 18th 1843. To which charge and specification the prisoner pleaded guilty.

 

Findings and Sentencing

The court after mature deliberation and the testimony address confirm the plea of the prisoner Daniel Shen a private of Company F 1st Regiment Artillery and do therefore sentence him to forfeit all pay and allowances excepting such sum as may be due the Sutler[5] and Laundress, to make good the time lost by desertion to receive thirty nine lashes on bare back, well laid on with a cow hide, to be at confined hard labor for the period of two months with a ball and chain, to forfeit four dollars of his monthly pay for the same time period.

 

 

 

 

[1] Referencing General Order Number 1 I will guard everything within the limits of my post and quit my post only when properly relieved.

 

[2] A Sutler was a civilian merchant who sells provisions to an army in the field, in camp, or in quarters. 

 

[3] A ball and chain was a physical restraint device historically applied to prisoners, a type of shackle, the ball and chain was designed so that the weight of the iron ball at the end of the short chain restricts and limits the pace at which its wearer is able to move, making any attempt at escape much more difficult.

 

[4] Fort Sullivan was a military fortification in Eastport, Maine. It lay opposite New Brunswick, Canada, and was built in 1808-09. Briefly held by the British in the war of 1812.